YAPC::NA 2012

Blogging YAPC::NA 2012

People are starting to write about YAPC::NA after the event, so I have a list of links in the sidebar for those. Also, I've been grabbing photos as they were posted and pinning them to my YAPC::NA 2012 board on Pinterest. I don't have anywhere near all the photos pinned there. If you'd like me to pin some of your photos, let me know. My Pinterest board and other collections of photos or videos are linked in another sidebar.

My Lightning talk: The Other Operating System

I do my perl now on Windows 7 using Padre and don't normally use the command line, so when I was in brian d foy's Zero to Perl Workshop, I found I couldn't keep up with his command line examples. I tried using the Windows cmd.exe, but had problems with admin rights, paths, and then some differences between *nix command line and cmd.exe. See the sidebar to get my talk in pdf and odt formats.

As a member of MadMongers, JT thought I knew enough perl to be a mentor in the class, so I was there for that and to fill in many gaps in my perl knowledge. It turned out that no one there was at "Zero" when it came to programming, though it seemed like a fair number of them were at "Zero" for perl. If I'd had the command line thing on Windows figured out ahead of time, I would have been much more useful.

My Bingo Card

I gave a lightning talk so I could fill in my whole Bingo card. I didn't succeed, but I got 20 of the 25 squares and I had several Bingo's. Here are the five things I didn't get to:

  • Buy someone a drink
  • Take some photos
  • Attend the Hackathon
  • Donate to TPF
  • Attend TPF Party

Stupid Perl Tricks

Here's stuff I learned at YAPC::NA 2012 that can really mess you up.

  • $Cat is not the same as $cat is not the same as $cAt is not the same as $caT
  • The scalar context of the comma operator. Evaluate the item to the left of the comma, discard, evalutate the item to the right of the comma. Continue to the last item. Unless one item is something like a
    die
    you end up with the evaluation of the last item after the last comma. Think about it.
    scalar (1,2,3)
    is 3.
    scalar (1,899,388, 40)
    is 40.
    Also, you waste time evaluated each item before and after each comma as well.
  • Something that evaluates to true has the value 1.
    print !!37;
    prints 1.
  • Something that evaluates to false has the value of the empty string.
    print !!37;
    prints nothing.